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Topeak Mini 20 Pro Review

The ToPeak Mini Pro 20 is as feature packed as multi-tools get, with 23 functions loaded into this small and well designed un
Editors' Choice Award
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Price:  $35 List | $32.60 at Amazon
Pros:  Feature packed, neoprene case, small
Cons:  Moderate weight
Manufacturer:   Topeak
By Jeremy Benson ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 8, 2018
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85
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#1 of 7
  • Ergonomics - 25% 8
  • Features - 25% 9
  • Ease of Use - 20% 8
  • Portability - 20% 9
  • Durability - 10% 8

The Skinny

The Mini Pro 20 is a fully featured multi-tool made by the bike accessory manufacturer, ToPeak. This compact model features 23 total functions, the most in the test, and has you covered for virtually every adjustment and simple fix you may encounter while out on the road or trail. ToPeak has managed to pack all these tools into a compact and reasonably lightweight, 153g, multi-tool that comes in a neoprene storage case. It has all the usual hex sizes from 2mm through 10mm, flat and Phillips head screwdrivers, Torx 10 and 25, plus an emergency tire lever, chain breaker, four sizes of spoke wrenches, and the ever-important bottle opener. In addition to all those tools, the Mini Pro 20 has relatively good ergonomics and feels comfortable in the hand while wrenching. The durable all-metal construction is sure to last you many years, plus it's also offered at a reasonable price. There was so little we didn't like about the Mini Pro 20, that we gave it our Editor's Choice Award.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

ToPeak makes a full line of cycling accessories for all types of riding including several models of multi-tools to cover a wide range of needs and wants. The Mini Pro 20 is the most fully featured model in their line of several "Mini" multi-tools. Testers quickly took a liking to it for its wealth of useful functions, 23 in total, good ergonomics, and relatively lightweight and small size. If you asked any of our testers which multi-tool they would like to keep for their own, we are pretty sure they would all choose the Mini Pro 20. The tester favorite also happens to be our highest rated model, earning it our Editor's Choice Award.

Performance Comparison


Trailside fix with the Mini Pro 20.
Trailside fix with the Mini Pro 20.

Features


With a full complement of 23 functions, the Mini Pro 20 is the most feature-packed tool in this review. Depending on your needs, more tools isn't necessarily always better, but it's hard to argue with a tool this small and lightweight with this many features. It comes with virtually every hex size you'll ever use, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 10mm. The 2mm hex is L-shaped and the 10mm is a removable head that fits on top of the 8mm. It has Torx 10 and Torx 25 bits, as well as both flathead and #2 Phillips head screwdrivers. It's got a removable chain breaker that has 4 sizes of spoke wrenches and a 3mm hex head integrated into it for tightening the tool should you ever need to. They've even added a stainless steel wire chain hook on the side of the chain breaker to hold your chain together while you're trying to work on it. Add to that an emergency metal tire lever and a hardened steel bottle opener with a spoke holder and you're covered for everything from repairing a broken chain to cracking a beer and everything in between. Plus, it comes with a lightweight neoprene case with a velcro closure.


If you're looking for the most functions, the Mini Pro 20 has got them. The OneUp EDC comes in a close second in the features department with 21, and the Crankbrothers M19 and the Blackburn Tradesman right behind that with 19 and 18 functions respectively. The 2 lightest weight models we tested both have far fewer tools, the Lezyne V10 with 10, and the Specialized EMT Pro MTB with 13. That said, how many tools you need depends on your needs, but we'll generally take the 50g weight penalty to carry the feature-packed Mini Pro 20.

A look at one of the most fully-featured multi-tools  the ToPeak Mini Pro 20.
A look at one of the most fully-featured multi-tools, the ToPeak Mini Pro 20.

Ergonomics


Ergonomically speaking, the Mini Pro 20 is good, not the best in the test, but not far behind either. It starts with the size of the tool, almost identical in length and width to the Specialized EMT Pro MTB which is one of our highest scoring tools for ergonomics. This size fits very nicely and comfortably in the palm of the hand and the edges of the side plates are rounded just enough to enhance the overall comfort. Testers found the 3-inch length of this tool be just right, as they could still grasp it tightly an apply plenty of torque when needed.


The tools themselves are on the shorter side, but still plenty long to reach most bolts with ease. One thing we were initially disappointed by but later came to enjoy is the fact that the chain breaker needs to be removed from the main body of the tool for use. At first, this seemed like an inconvenience, but this actually allows for easier manipulation of the tool with a larger tab on the bottom of the chain breaker to grasp. This is in contrast to some of the smaller chain breakers, like those found on the Lezyne V10 of the OneUp EDC, which are just a little harder to get a really firm grip on. While we really didn't mind the overall ergonomics and hand feel of the Mini Pro 20, it was ultimately outdone in this metric by the Specialized EMT Pro MTB and the Crankbrothers M19 with their more contoured side plates and impressively comfortable grips.

The Mini Pro 20 feels good in the hand with a shape that allows for a confident grip. The tools are also a nice length for reaching all your bolts.
The Mini Pro 20 feels good in the hand with a shape that allows for a confident grip. The tools are also a nice length for reaching all your bolts.

Portability


Considering the number of tools and functions packed into the Mini Pro 20, it is shockingly small in its overall size and weight. It tips the scales at 153g for just the tool, and 161g in its neoprene case. It is by no means necessary to use the case that the tool comes in, but it is a nice feature should you stash the tool with other metal objects in your pack or saddle bag, or against your body in a jersey pocket or storage bibs. Including the case, it weighs roughly 10-15g less than the heaviest models in our test, and around 55g more than the lightest competitors. If you are truly weight obsessed then you'll probably be happier with fewer features and less weight with the Lezyne V10 or the Specialized EMT Pro MTB. If you're more interested in tools and functions then the Mini Pro 20 is still lightweight considering all of its features.


The size of this multi-tool is also impressive. It is nearly tied for the second smallest model in the test with the Specialized EMT Pro MTB. The two tools are the same width, but the ToPeak is an eighth of an inch longer and slightly thicker overall. Considering the fact that it has 10 more functions than the Specialized tool we think this is quite impressive. While all of the multi-tools in this review are plenty portable, the Mini Pro 20 is noticeably smaller than the Crankbrother M19, Blackburn Tradesman, and Park Tool IB-3. While the OneUp EDC is easily portable in its own way, the Mini Pro 20 offers more in the way of versatility.

It's far from the lightest  but considering the wealth of tools we think it is a reasonable weight.
It's far from the lightest, but considering the wealth of tools we think it is a reasonable weight.

Ease of Use


The Mini-Pro 20 is just about as easy to use as most of the other tools in this test. It loses a little ground in this metric due to the fact that you need to remove it from its case, and the chain tool needs to be removed to use any of the tools associated with that part of the tool. Taking the tool out of its cover is fantastically simple, but it is an extra step that some of the models don't have. You also need to keep track of the case so you don't lose it. Should you chose to not carry the case of the 9g weight savings, then you won't have to pull the tool out of its case every time you use it.


The majority of the tools on the Mini Pro 20 are straightforward to find and fold out. The most commonly used sizes of hex keys even have their size printed on them for quick and easy identification. The less frequently used tools, like the chain breaker, the spoke wrenches, the chain hook, and the tool tightener all live on the chain breaker. In the case of the Mini Pro 20, the chain breaker is a separate piece that is held in place on one side of the tool by way of the pin pusher threaded through the side plate. It is held securely in place here and stays out of the way until you need to use it. Using the chain breaker, or any of the tools integrated into it, involves removing it from the rest of the tool. This is an added step, but as we mentioned above, it improves the overall ergonomics of the chain breaker and makes it easier and more comfortable to use.

It's generally a very user-friendly tool. We especially liked the chain tool for its size despite needing to remove it from the main body of the tool for use.
It's generally a very user-friendly tool. We especially liked the chain tool for its size despite needing to remove it from the main body of the tool for use.

Durability


Like many of the other tools in this review, the Mini Pro 20 features a durable all metal construction. It is crafted with forged aluminum side plates and corrosion resistant Chrome vanadium steel bits. The chain tool is made of CrMo steel and the bottle opener is made of hardened steel. Despite repeated use during our test period, the tool and all of bits and pieces look nearly brand new. There are no signs of rounding or stripping on any of the bits, nor any corrosion of any kind visible.


We found the Mini Pro 20 to be on par with most of the other all-metal tools in this review from a durability standpoint. We feel, however, that it outperforms the Park Tool IB-3 with its stripped Torx 25 bit and less durable slotted plastic tire lever. We also feel that the large amounts of plastic involved in the body of the OneUp EDC tool may also be prone to breakage and premature wear.

Its got a durable all-metal construction  anti-corrosion bits  and a convenient neoprene storage case.
Its got a durable all-metal construction, anti-corrosion bits, and a convenient neoprene storage case.

Best Applications


The Mini Pro 20 is a great multi-tool for any type of cycling. It has all of the functions you could ever need, with good ergonomics at a reasonably low weight and small size. We wouldn't hesitate to toss this in our fanny pack for mountain biking and switch it to our saddlebag or jersey pocket for a road or gravel ride.

Value


With a retail price of only $35, the Mini Pro 20 is a great value, especially considering the fact that it's our highest rated multi-tool and our Editor's Choice Award winner. The price difference among most of the multi-tools is relatively minimal, but we think you get a lot for your money here.

Conclusion


Of the seven different models we tested, the Mini Pro 20 rose to the top as our highest rated contender and is the winner of our first ever bike multi-tool Editor's Choice Award. ToPeak has managed to create an incredibly versatile feature-packed tool with good ergonomics at a relatively lightweight and small size. If you're looking for the multi-tool that can do it all and comes in a well-designed and tight little package, then check out the reasonably priced and fully-featured Mini Pro 20.

Other Versions and Accessories


The Mini Pro 20 (tested) is the most fully featured of the "Mini" models in ToPeak's range of multi-tools. It comes in three color options, black (tested), silver, and gold.
The Mini 18+ ($35) has 20 functions and weighs 185g. It has all the same tools as the Mini Pro 20, minus the T10, bottle opener, spoke holder, and the Mavic spoke wrench, but adds a disc pad spreader.
The Mini 9 Pro ($25) has 9 functions and weighs in at 73g. This is a minimalist tool with 2, 2.5, 3, 4, and 5mm Allen keys, a T25, a #2 Phillips head screwdriver, and 2 tire levers.

The Mini 9 ($17) has 9 functions and weighs 92g. It has 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm Allen keys, a T25, and a #2 Phillips screwdriver.


Jeremy Benson