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Hands-on Gear Review

Outdoor Research Alpine Bivy Review

Top Pick Award
Price:   $249 List | $244.95 at Amazon
Compare prices at 4 resellers
Pros:  Durable, Lots of head room, completely waterproof
Cons:  Heavy, bulky, slightly narrow
Editors' Rating:     
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Manufacturer:   Outdoor Research

Our Verdict

Can a bivy sack provide all of the protection of a tent without sacrificing comfort? The OR Alpine Bivy does a fantastic job of keeping weather out while remaining a solid shelter, winning our Top Pick award for Weather Resistance. Whether in a gnarly mountain storm or on a pleasant weekend trip, this product performs extremely well, providing comfort along with security. While the $240 price tag rivals that of a full-sized tent, the bivy can crunch into a small stuff sack and is considerably lighter than the average backpacking tent. We feel confident that this bivy will keep the user dry and warm in the backcountry and enhance your overall camping experience.


RELATED REVIEW: The Best Bivy Sack Review


Our Analysis and Hands-on Test Results

Review by:
Greg Davis
Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Thursday
September 25, 2014

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Hands-On Review


Most bivy sacks on the market do one or two things really well while falling short in other areas of performance. Whether they are too big or the material is thin and frail, all the bivies tested had small things we would have liked to see changed except for the OR Alpine Bivy. This product scored high on each metric and remained waterproof and breathable through each test. A good bivy should be a comfortable home in a storm and under that principle this model stood above the competition. With great head room, an optional bug net, and a completely waterproof system, all weighing only 2 pounds, we just can't ask for much more. While some might find it a touch narrow, our testers fit easily, even adding in a few pieces of gear that had to be kept dry. We quickly fell in love with the extra features which were well-worth the small amount of extra weight.

Performance Comparison


A tent pole allows plenty of head room  a great feature when stuck inside for long periods of time.
A tent pole allows plenty of head room, a great feature when stuck inside for long periods of time.

Weather Protection


This was the only bivy tested that uses Gore-Tex waterproof material, an industry standard and trusted name in the world of waterproof/breathable fabrics. Three-layer Gore-Tex body is used on top with a burly 70D nylon floor coated in Hydroseal for added waterproofness when in the wettest of deluges. During long stays stuck in the sack, our testers found proper ventilation by simply cracking the stiff zipper flaps a few inches near the head. Due to the bathtub design and zipper placement, this technique works even if pitched in a puddle!

Deploying the Gore-Tex fabric over the face during a rainstorm is easy, even in the dark, thanks to reflective tape and a neon green ribbon running the length of the zippers. All seams are taped and five stake loops, along with a single guy loop, aid in a comfortable pitch. We found that staking and guying out the OR Alpine was really important for maximum comfort and ventilation. However, the stake loops seemed a little small — they were just fine for softer ground that you can easily get a smaller stake in but we thought it might be a good idea to have some extra cord to extend the stake loops if you needed flexibility for staking in rocky ground or dead-manning in snowy conditions. While some felt that there were issues with breathability and condensation, most of our testers were able to stay ahead of the tide by being diligent in keeping a portion of the zippers open. If planning to be stuck sitting out a storm in a bivy, one can do no better than this product.

14 hours of soaking later and the GoreTex waterproofing continued to breathe and keep our testers dry.
14 hours of soaking later and the GoreTex waterproofing continued to breathe and keep our testers dry.

Ventilation


This model performed very well in the ventilation category. While it is made of a completely waterproof fabric which is not known to breathe very well, it has several features that allow for added ventilation, making it easy to keep condensation down. In clear and warm weather the bivy can be left open, allowing warm air to circulate out. Likewise, during colder nights leaving a small opening in the zipper when completely enclosed in the system is sufficient for staving off condensed breath from building up on the inside shell. This bivy can be staked out when ground and space conditions allow and it also has a pole at the head to give space. These features are key to providing space between the bivy fabric and you, which lets air flow around and condensation escape more easily.

As with even the best ventilated waterproof bivies, its likely you will still accumulate some moisture inside. A feature unique to the OR Alpine is that the floor is coated with an anti-fungal treatment and on long trips mildew and mold were not present despite intense moisture and humidity.

The high quality nylon fabric showed no sign of wear despite heavy use in rocky terrain.
The high quality nylon fabric showed no sign of wear despite heavy use in rocky terrain.

Comfort


A long storm or winter night spent in a bivy sack can leave one feeling like a mummy in a tomb. While more pleasant than a sarcophagus, few campers look forward to a night tucked away in eight square feet of nylon. Luckily for our testing team, the OR Alpine, with ample floor-to-ceiling room and a durable tent pole, felt more like a small backpacking tent than a bivy sack. The pole also keeps the bug net taught and out of the face when the waterproof hood is peeled back, without any collapsing material annoying falling onto the user and keeping the late night mosquitos from biting. One other plus for this product is that it includes straps to hold your sleeping pad in place. This is always a great feature for those that toss and turn through the night — once you get things a bit twisted, it can be much harder to

The one knock we had in comfort was the slightly narrow profile. The 26" width at the shoulder is enough for even a large sleeping pad, but little extra room is available to store gear that must be kept dry. However, our testers had no issues and only the largest campers should notice, and at the end of the day, a bivy is not meant to store gear. A positive aspect of the space inside is the vertical clearance, and the ability to toss and turn without disrupting the stiff nylon shell fabric is a bonus.

By clearing a few rocks and using an insulated coat as a pillow even a bivy sack can give a good night's sleep.
By clearing a few rocks and using an insulated coat as a pillow even a bivy sack can give a good night's sleep.

Weight


The OR Alpine is one of the heaviest of our test group. There was only one other sack reviewed that weighted in at around 2 pounds, and of the two, the Black Diamond Big Wall Hooped Bivy was far less comfortable and breathable. A few ounces can be shaved off the Alpine bivy by leaving the tent pole in the car, however if any considerable amount of time is expected to be spent pent up inside the sack, we recommend taking it with and dealing with a little bit of extra weight. We would like to see a lighter weight top fabric, as the durability of the 40 Denier Gore-Tex shell was more than sufficient for even the most hard-core use.

While some of our reviewers felt that the weight and features were overkill for average backpacking, many people may appreciate the complete, four season weather protection of this sack. If you don't need 4-season protection, you can find ultra-lightweight tents and tarps that are similar in weight but will give more space and comfort while hanging out at camp.

The OR Alpine Bivy (front) can save up to a few pounds off of a typical one-person backpacking tent (back) because it has fewer poles  fabric  and zippers.
The OR Alpine Bivy (front) can save up to a few pounds off of a typical one-person backpacking tent (back) because it has fewer poles, fabric, and zippers.

Packed Size


This bivy runs a bit long when packed up, coming in at 15.25 inches long. This is the second largest bivy in our test group (the BD Big Wall was the largest), and almost as large as some ultra-lightweight tents. Often we found that the best place to pack it away was in a water bottle pocket or an exterior mesh pocket where the extra length presented less of a problem. Just as easily, the included tent pole can be removed from the stuff sack so that the bivy portion can be crammed wherever you have extra open space, such as a cooking pot, pack lid or in between other items in your pack, while the pole slid safely out of the way. Overall, we felt the large packaged size wasn't ideal, but that the versatility and complete protection that the OR Alpine provides makes it worth it.

The OR Apline model was large and often had to be stored on the outside of the pack. We found that a water bottle pocket worked well.
The OR Apline model was large and often had to be stored on the outside of the pack. We found that a water bottle pocket worked well.

Best Applications


Anyone looking to ditch a tent and start camping with a bivy sack will come to appreciate the comfortable features and complete weather resistance offered in this sack.

Value


This bivy is one of the higher cost options of our test group, at a retail price of $249. High quality materials such as Gore-Tex and Hydroseal are reasonable luxuries for a high quality product. Some ultra-lightweight tents or shelters are close in size or weight, but are usually not stand-alone or 4-season shelters. So given the compactness, durability and versatility of the OR Alpine, we think the higher price tag is worth it.

Conclusion


The OR Alpine quickly became the favorite product that our testing team would reach for on each trip. While not the smallest or lightest of the products in this review, the four-season OR Alpine was by far the most versatile, most comfortable, and best performing. This product i similar to ultralight tents in weight and bulk but costs less than most ultralight tent options. It also offers far more protection from bugs and wind than a tarp. While the weight and bulk of the product might leave a few ultralight enthusiasts looking elsewhere, most will soon love the ease of use and sleep filled nights to be had in this wonderful design.

Other Versions and Accessories


Outdoor Research Bug Bivy
OR Bug Bivy
  • Cost - $80
  • Nylon bug net bivy
  • One pole design allows for ample head room for reading and relaxing inside
  • 1lbs total weight

For maximum comfort and performance combine your bivy with one of the Best Sleeping Pads and the Best Sleeping Bag.
Greg Davis and Sarah Hegg

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OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: April 5, 2015
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:   
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Average Customer Rating:   
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2 Total Ratings
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   Apr 5, 2015 - 01:26pm
placemaps · Kayaker · San Francisco
(Edit - answer below)
Not sure where to post questions, so…. would a 26" rectangular sleeping pad fit in the Alpine Bivy? It looks like shoulders would be fine, but it tapers towards feet. A slight curl on the edges I think would be ok. Sea to Summit Comfort Plus Insulated Rectangular Sleeping Pad size large is 26" would be an indulgent, spacious sleeping pad which I'm considering. Yes they have a mummy shaped one, but if I could get away w/ the Rectangular pad, that would be ideal, as most of the time I'm using it for kayak camping with a 2 person tent. Anyone able to see if it would fit?

Answering my own question: Sea to Summit Comfort Plus Insulated Rectangular Sleeping Pad size large DOES fit in the Apline Bivy surprisingly enough. There is a little bit of curling near the feet with both corners curling up a bit and because of width it does lower the height of the foot area. That said, the pad fits the base of the bivy sack, though very snuggly. Save weight using bivy, splurge with luxury sleeping pad :)
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Sep 28, 2014 - 11:00pm
 
Dirka · Climber · SF
So many nights in all conditions. Protection luv hate thing. Works!
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