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Mammut Contact Dyneema Review

   

Climbing Slings

  • Currently 4.0/5
Overall avg rating 4.0 of 5 based on 5 reviews. Most recent review: October 26, 2010
Street Price:   Varies from $5 - $10 | Compare prices at 6 resellers
Pros:  Light, low bulk.
Cons:  Hard to untie, not most durable.
Best Uses:  Trad climbing, big wall climbing.
User Rating:     
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 (4.8 of 5) based on 4 reviews
Recommendations:  100% of reviewers (4/4) recommend this product
Manufacturer:   Mammut
Review by: Chris McNamara ⋅ Founder and Editor-in-Chief, OutdoorGearLab ⋅ April 19, 2010  
Overview
The Mammut Contact Dyneema slings were some of the first skinny climbing slings to appear. When I first saw them I reacted as many people do: "Really, those are full strength?" But yes, they are full strength. And thanks to a patented "Contact stitching method" they are maybe the thinnest and lightest slings available.

Overall, these are our top choice for Sierra routes and alpine climbs because they are so light. They performed well in our tests except for the durability test where we found them lacking when compared to the similar Mammut Crocodile. For big walls or heavy use on trad climbs, go with a more durable 10mm sling like Mammut's Crocodile or the Black Diamond Dynex Runner. The super skinny design also makes this sling difficult to untie once a knot is weighted. It seems that its greatest strength (super skinniness) is also the source of its greatest weaknesses (durability, knot untying). For overall utility, durability and price, it's hard to beat the regular old 9/16 webbing. But if you want the lightest sling with the least bulk, this is it.

View our complete Climbing Sling Review to see how this product compared to others.

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OutdoorGearLab Editors' Hands-on Review

Likes
The best part of these is their light weight and low bulk. You can have eight around your shoulder and still not notice them. The fact they are the same strength as a carabiner is hard to believebut true! Mammut uses a cool sewing trick on the Contact sling where one of the ends of the tape is sewn inside the other. This eliminates the bump at the bartacks of the sling caused by one end overlapping the other. The trick is pretty cool, and does create a smoother handling sling, but in the grand scheme it is really not a game changer.

Dislikes
These are not the most durable slings. They wear down faster than the 10mm slings we tested and much faster than most of the nylon slings we tested. If you take care of your gear this is no big deal. But if you heavily use your stuff, as on a big wall, you might want a sling with a little more heft. We also had a tough time untying these guys once a knot had been loaded, making them a less than ideal choice for many anchor building situations.

As with all Dyneema slings, the strength of the fibers is significantly diminished by elevated temperatures. These Dyneema slings should not be used as a rappel backup or be involved in any sort of friction knot system. The friction of the rope on the slings' fibers can actually melt the sling!

Check out this article by DMM about the characteristics of nylon and Dyneema slings.

Value
These are among the more expensive slings; usually $1 to $2 more than most other slings. But it's what you pay to have the lightest and least bulky slings available.

Best Application
These are ideal for any trad climbing application or alpine climbing where weight savings are crucial

Other Versions
Mammut Crocodile Sling- at 10mm it's much more durable.

Chris McNamara, Robert Beno

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OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: October 26, 2010
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:   
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  • 5
 (3.0)
Average Customer Rating:   
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  • 5
 (4.8)

100% of 4 reviewers recommend it
Rating Distribution
5 Total Ratings
5 star: 60%  (3)
4 star: 20%  (1)
3 star: 20%  (1)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)
Sort 4 member reviews by: Most Recent | Most Helpful
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   Oct 26, 2010 - 04:19pm
rhyang · Climber · SJC
I use these on my alpine rack, to save weight on my back and bulk in my pack.

The longevity issues of skinny dyneema slings have been written about elsewhere, but I have other slings for use at the crags.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Sep 2, 2010 - 12:06am
disposable · Climber · sb, ca
Personally i love these for their weight and bulk savings. I have gotten longer lives from bulkier BD dyneema or generic nylon, but they're not exactly brittle… Maybe 80% longevity of bigger dyneema/spectra in normal use (trad and alpine on granite), though more significant difference in high-risk settings (retired brand new one after third fall over gritty joshua tree ledge nearly cut all the way through… Nylon and bigger would surely have fared better).

In other words, I've been grateful for the weight and bulk savings dozens of times, and only worried about the total failure issue during a single reckless day. Durability and longevity are often overruled by bulk and weight savings, and these are no exception.

OH! And that slick little sewing trick is pretty rad. I didn't realize how much i appreciate the smooth action until i was forced to use my old set of 10mm shoulder length BD Spectra for a long alpine day. I must have snagged on the bar tack section at least a dozen times. The little things…

J

J

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   May 17, 2010 - 06:23pm
msiddens · Climber
GREAT slings and I run but single and double shoulders. Singles are for the "alpine" style of aiders while the doubles are over the shoulders for extending placements and/or the occasional belay duty. These rock and it is true that the low bulk designs ends up making me carry more than I need resulting it less rope drag and safer gear placements less prone to pulling.

Overall the rock but without question they do "fuzz" up more quickly. Replace them every few years (depending on use).

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   May 17, 2010 - 05:46pm
Mike. · Climber
No gripes, performance as advertised. I own shoulder length and 1' loop sizes.


Agree that the only possible shortcomings are durability and price, but to elaborate:

This very thin sling wears about as much as most other sewn slings I've used, but the fact that it's so thin makes wear more of a concern. I don't see this sling wearing at a noticeably greater rate than any other I've owned.

You get what you pay for generally--as is the case here IMO.


This sling trick-tripled is as small and light as some 'draws, with the huge trad/wall advantage of being extandable. Used un-extended as a draw, I would guess this sling to be more cut resistant and considerably stronger than most or any single 'draw.

I recently took a decent fall on an extended Mammut which was draped over a rounded rock edge. No issues at all. The thing did look kind "permanently stretched," so off active duty it went. It earned retirement.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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Mammut Contact Dyneema Sling
Credit: http://www.mammut.ch
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