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Omega Pacific Link Cam Review

   

Climbing Cams

  • Currently 3.3/5
Overall avg rating 3.3 of 5 based on 18 reviews. Most recent review: September 19, 2013
Street Price:   Varies from $82 - $112 | Compare prices at 5 resellers
Pros:  Amazing Range, Awesome Crux piece
Cons:  Heavy, expensive, Complex
Best Uses:  Free climbing crux piece, Any place with deep bottomless cracks whether in Yosemite or Indian Creek.
User Rating:     
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 (3.4 of 5) based on 17 reviews
Recommendations:  67% of reviewers (10/15) recommend this product
Manufacturer:   Omega Pacific
Review by: Robert Beno ⋅ February 1, 2010  
Overview
The Omega Pacific Link Cam camming device is revolutionary in design and is an awesome free climbing crux piece for those "Oh sh*t" moments. The range provided by the tri-sected cam lobes is amazing allowing each cam to fit in a lot of placements. If you’re gripped with a case of Elvis leg and need a piece now, reach for a Link Cam as you’ll have the greatest chance of getting a fit. We found that the Link Cams work pretty well in flaring cracks and work just as well as any other cam in parallel sided cracks. The flexible single stem helps cut down on walking and allows for good functionality in horizontal placements. We also noticed that the trisected lobes increases the amount of cam lobe touching the rock creating a more solid and stable placement making the Link Cams one of the least liable to walk of all the cams we tested. Although the link cams have an amazing range and can fit into a lot of placements, the extra materials and complex design needed for the tri-sected cam lobes adds a lot of weight to each unit. They are by far the heaviest cam that we tested. With no high-clip in point and the extra weight, these cams are not going to be your first pick for aid and big walls or for any other scenario where traveling light is key. Additionally, while the added complexity to the cams’ design makes it possible to fit Link Cams in a wide range of placements, the design makes using these cams more, well, complex. There are a lot more moving parts and areas of weakness to take into account. Omega Pacific emphasizes that proper placement in line with the direction of pull is critical for placing Link Cams. While this is not necessarily a bad thing, as we should be concentrating on proper placement for all camming units, we feel that some other cams are more forgiving of marginal diligence in placement than the Link Cam. Link Cams also carry a hefty price tag so be prepared to shell out for these guys. All in all, the Link Cams are an awesome specialty free climbing piece. They come in super handy for the “need it now” scenarios and they are awesome for setting anchors. If you are looking for something lighter and more suited for aid climbing, check out Black Diamond Camalot C4. And for the lightest cam on the market try Metolius Ultralight Powercam.

View our complete Camming Device Review to see how this product compared to others.

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OutdoorGearLab Editors' Hands-on Review

Likes
The most obvious advantage of the link cams is the incredible range that each unit can fit. The innovative tri-sected lobe design makes the range of each of these cams significantly larger than any of the other cams we tested. This increased range makes Link Cams an ideal crux piece: reach for these when you’re gripped and need a piece fast that is sure to fit. The tri-sected cam lobes also provide an advantage when trying to stick a cam into an awkward placement. These things work miracles in flaring cracks and awkward placements. Backcountry adventurers will appreciate the increased range in that it might eliminate the number of "im not sure if I'll need this" pieces that you have to lug around: one link cam could cover 2 of your "maybe" pieces.

In designing the tri-sected lobes for the Link Cam, Omega Pacific uses machined steel for the first two sections of each lobe increasing durability and strength. The outer section is anodized aluminum, but we typically found ourselves placing these cams with one of the first two sections contacting the rock so we appreciated the extra durability.

Once placed, the link cams’ lobes typically have a lot of surface contact with the rock increasing stability and cutting down on walking caused by the movement of the rope. These cams work well in horizontal and vertical placements, but as emphasized on Omega Pacific’s website, it is critical that the cams be properly placed in line with the direction of pull. The complex design of the lobes is susceptible to breaking when tweaked and torqued due to improper placement, so while these are ideal for those crux placements, make sure that you are making good placements.

Dislikes
The biggest obvious drawback to the link cam is that with the increased range, and steel sections of the cam lobes, comes increased weight as well. Though not any bulkier than a traditional cam, Link Cams are by far the heaviest cams that we tested. The idea is that because they have such a great range you will need to carry less pieces and so the weight evens out. We found that if we need 8 pieces for a pitch, we need 8 pieces no matter what, even if one of those pieces would have fit in any one of the 8 placements.

Also with the increased innovation in the design comes increased complexity and fragility. As mentioned above, link cams are highly prone to damage or failure when not placed properly and loaded not in line with the direction of pull.

Last but not least, a big problem that we had with the Link Cam is the price tag. These are the most expensive cam that we tested and for a climber on a budget, they are not a great option.

Best Application
Free climbing crux piece: if you’re pumped reach for one of these, place it and move on. Anchor setting.

Value
Pricey, pricey, pricey. With the cheapest unit costing just shy of $100 these are the most expensive cam that we tested.

Robert Beno

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OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: September 19, 2013
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:   
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 (3.0)
Average Customer Rating:   
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  • 5
 (3.4)

67% of 15 reviewers recommend it
Rating Distribution
16 Total Ratings
5 star: 31%  (5)
4 star: 19%  (3)
3 star: 19%  (3)
2 star: 19%  (3)
1 star: 13%  (2)
Sort 17 member reviews by: Most Recent | Most Helpful
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Feb 20, 2010 - 01:47pm
 
rgold · Climber · Poughkeepsie, NY
I've already given an opinion (which is, by the way, supported by the manufacturer) that link cams are specialty pieces and shouldn't be relied on for all types of rock and all types of placements. But some of the ecstatic no-reservations posts that followed those comments seem to me to demand further cautions. One theme that has surfaced is the superiority of link cams in flared placements. I consider this to be a highly questionable claim and would suggest that users at least familiarize themselves with the issues involved.
  1. Flared placements put much higher loads on the cams than parallel-sided placements. The links in link cams have already proven to be weak points and might not be up to the higher loads involved.
  1. The claims about link cams advantages in flared placements seem to be predicated on the additional contact provided by the various linked pieces. But one has to ask

(a) Do the additional links provide any additional holding power, and
(b) if they do, are the links then stressed in ways they were not designed for.

As for part (a), once the links have unfolded and are down the shaft, they no longer participate in the logarithmic spiral of the primary contact cam. At best, they have a considerably larger cam angle, which means that, if indeed they function at all, their contribution to holding power will be minimal and perhaps negligible.

As for part (b), again assuming the retracted portion of the cams function at all, their ability to function would involve transferring the load to the open link above the cam. These links have already proven to be problematic when loaded in the proper closed position, and could be considerably more inclined to buckle when open.

Of course, this is speculation---but informed speculation---and is not, in principle, worth any more than tests that could confirm or deny it; tests that have yet to be performed as far as I know. In the meantime, there are many reasons to think that link cams in flared placements might actually be less reliable than a corresponding ordinary cam.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
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   Feb 5, 2010 - 12:52pm
crustie · Climber · SF, CA
I thought I loved these cams. I thought they were great for the reasons everyone does. Until my friend's broke (at the connection between the trigger and the cam). And then another friend's broke in the same place. And then mine did. (at least 2 of these broke within the first year or so of use). I wrote to OP and they never responded. I bought them at REI so I just returned them there, but I expected better response from OP. It's too bad, I liked the idea of a cam that ranges 2-3 other cams.

Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this product to a friend.
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   Sep 19, 2013 - 01:07am
GearMe · Climber
These are speciality pieces that can only go into vertical and parallel cracks. They are far from the "Oh sh!t" pieces that Omega Pacific advertise them to be because they are only safe in very specific placements. It kind of defeats the purpose of having them if you can only put them in nice parallel cracks because parallel cracks are the easiest to size and place cams in. If you can't even do that, you shouldn't be trad climbing.

Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this product to a friend.
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   May 12, 2011 - 11:39pm
pbeurskens · Climber · Seattle
I've had the 1 and 2 for a while and like them. Just got a set of all four and can't wait to try out the smaller ones. I have to point out that the .5 and .75 sizes ARE LIGHTER THAN BD CAMALOTS. Everywhere on the web says these are the heaviest pieces out there. Yes, the 1 and 2 are heavier than Camalots but you almost make that weight up with the lightness of the smaller sizes and the range.

I would echo others points about the need to place with direction of pull correct but you should really always go for that.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   May 6, 2010 - 02:30pm
cheesemaster · Climber · Seattle, WA
A contender for most fun piece to place, after my #11 hex. Great piece to save for late in the climb where you may be a bit unsure as what size you may need.
Super bomber placements in wide pods with a narrow opening (the kind that a cam small enough to fit in would just rattle around in there) just crank it down all the way to get it in, then let it pop out into the gloriousness that is the link cam.
Recommend just the red and orange sizes, those smaller ones tend to be a bit harder to place with all the extra bulk

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Mar 10, 2010 - 07:23pm
clockclimb · Climber · Orem, Utah
When I first saw these I thought they looked and felt like garbage. Then I cleaned one and started making placements with it. Fantastic! I wouldn't want them for my only pieces since you have to be more careful about lining them up exactly with the direction of pull. They also won't fit in smaller pods. I have five of them and use them a lot.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Feb 3, 2010 - 09:38pm
Al_T.Tude · Climber · Monterey, CA
As Karmakanix's lesser half, I can attest to the veracity of his comments. Yes, they did have some minor teething problems early on which were aggressively addressed by OP. No problems since.
>
I generally rack up most, if not all of his ~10 links and then fill out the rest of my rack with offset stoppers, larger active cams if we're going wide and, of course, a couple of .5 tri cams - no climb is complete 'til you sink the pink.
>
Posters have criticized the price and weight of Link Cams. My experience is quite the opposite. With other cams, I find that I often have 30-40% of them still hanging on my rack at the end of the pitch even after construction of the upper belay station. Typically, the only way to have the correct sized cam when I need it is to bring too many - to allow for the unknowns that I will encounter.
>
With Link Cams I often find myself carrying only 10-15% (if any!) when all is said and done. Their range is so great that I can almost always find a piece on my rack to plug a gap at hand. As a result, I can buy and carry noticably fewer pricey, bulky SLCDs. I call that cheaper and lighter!
>
Of course they are not for every situation, but neither is any other piece. Obviously, shallow vertical cracks are not their forte. But, due to their amazing expansion range, they can almost serve as offset cams when encountering flares and pin scars. If you find them moving around, your sling is too short. Slings are alot lighter and cheaper than cams.
>
There have been a multitude of incremental improvements to Jardine's original concept, but Greg Lowe's Link Cam is the first truly Quantum leap.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Feb 3, 2010 - 03:07pm
Karmakanix · Climber · Berkeley CA
I have had these cams since the beginning of their reign. Like some other wall lizards, I had a couple of failures early on. Three trips up Lenas Lieback to retrieve one with a leatherman and two nut tools. Whaah! Gottem outta there, went home, and emailed Omega Pacific. They called within an hour. "Whahappened?? How many you got?? Sendem all back!!" Within the week all 3 were back home and healthy. The failure was the pins holding the wires to the plastic trigger were just pressed in. The fixed units had screw in pins glued in tight. Never happened again in 5 years of plunking them in. I started writing OmPac ever year, begging for more sizes.

I bought more Links a few years back. Yeah, the wires popped off too easy, the intention was to have things field serviceable. They sorted that fix out too!! Just squeeze Louise on the eyelet end and never pops off the pin again. Then last year, in the land of ODDZ, the green and purple Links appeared. Since my Polish sausage digits require me to french anything thin finger, I stocked up. 4 purple, 3 greens, 1 more yellow (gold) and 1 more red. So now I have all three generations. The latest Links have a full length axle instead of individual pins, stronger by far, even though the early versions don't fail here at all any more. The Woolly Willy pull wire pop off trick has also been eliminated. Between me and my full fledged crazy partner, we have stufffffed this gear at least a thousand times, no failures, Fer Real. Bomber bigger and better than a BlitzKreig. Absolutely happy. There are 18 cams I no longer carry cuz I gottit dialed with Links. Canya tell I love cracks????

Somebody has to emphasize the crowning glory of a Linkcam ---> The dreaded FFLlaarring crack. The ability of a Link to go mini in the crotch, medium in the middle and large in the OMG part of a flare makes it the king of camz. Hands down. Granted the ranted flare hasta be fairly deep, and only flaring within reason, but it will definitely grip like a gorilla's gonads in flares where your hands have no chance of sticking. Sure you might be able to walk one out, but that is why Dog made long slings, huh??

And Yeah, I have encountered lotsa placements where Links were the only choice. One other conundrum the Link solves above all others is the perfect pocket. Ya got a .75" entrance into a 1.5" pocket, all other camz that can get in just warble around like a wounded bird. The Link drops in and expandos into place like a fireman's fist.

I used to carry my few Links, reach the hairy scary stance, stuff in my Buddy the Link and clip, futz around slotting an HB or some other clincher bomb, then retrieve my Link and move on. I felt SAFE! Now that I broke my bank and bought a lotta Links, I just shove in and move on. No more Missing Link. I tend to reach the top belay at the end of the day and find I fired in more Links than anything, all day, and some nights.

One other asset worth the Midas mounds that Links are made from is crummy rock. Like Pinnacles or the left side of Washington Column (Lunch Ledge, Piton Traverse, Direct Route, Regeilhuth Chimney, Great Chimney <ring any bells??>), i.e. Chosspiles. When the grainy sheit pours out like a kids marble sack when the cams walk a bit. A regular BD or Friend simply runs outta size and goes kamakazi kwickly, but a Link cam can shed some rock and still just keep digging in like a loctite linebacker. I know the placement doesn't sound real promising, but sometimes that's whatcha got. Forget nuts or tricams, the situation would get darn dicey fast. Yet a Link will stay pasted beyond your wildest dreams. And Whaddif your hadda protect offa a huge flexing flake. Not good, Mickey, shudder, shudder. The whole idea would befoul the boxers on a bronze statue. But what else would not pop when aided upon?? I don't wanna do it either, but Whaddiff…….??? Those other micro cams just don't have the range to flex around without failing at all!! And you may leave said piece behind fixed where no man should trust it. Not wise if Yoda ever yanks on it again.

So my guess is that the dissers on this thread have got the adolescent version of these cams, when pins popped and wires wriggled off. Those days are OVER. And if you are stuck with a piece that pisses you off, I'll bet OmPac would love to make it right, they have fixed all my prior problems, and ASAP as well. No Bitch, No Moan, just Fixed. They are climbers, they know.

Nuf Said, Stick a crowbar in your wallet and pound out a pile of Links. You will not regret it. Without naming names, there are sites that sell the tricksters for around $80 each. Salivate and invest. And start writing OmPac begging for bigger. I can't wait to shed those 3--->5's from my rack. I love a good awfulwidth, but dragging that pro is a pain. Pulleeeze start making the New Blue size, I could save a whale of weight.

JSMe

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Feb 2, 2010 - 12:18pm
Rocman · Climber · Reno,NV
sorry, the first thing I learned is simpler the better,these have too many moving parts to screw up in the hands of the beginner at placing crack gear plus the $$$,I have had climbers say I only need to carry a few,I guss they like running it out,4 pices in a pitch,and no feild repair kit,ez to fix,leave behind

Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this product to a friend.
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   Feb 1, 2010 - 01:30am
chusmacha · Climber · Bozeman, MT
So far, I've scrounged three link cams. Two of them required three return trips each to retrieve, heck of a lot of work. I would have to say that they have a tendency to get stuck. I find them on moderate climbs. One was in usable condition, but I have stopped carrying it because it will end up getting stuck again. They have too many moving parts, too easy for something to go wrong. One had three broken wires. One had four broken wires. Cams with broken wires are a thousand times more difficult to remove than cams with wires intact. The cost of these cams means they will get lots of retrieval work which will damage them.

Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this product to a friend.
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   Jan 23, 2010 - 02:50am
Salamanizer · Climber · The land of Fruits & Nuts!
Perfect for the parallel, suck for everything else. Much to limited range of operation for me. I wouldn't even consider carrying anything like it up anything but an Indian Creek type splitter. For that type of climbing I think they are awesome but still limited due to weight.

There are many moving parts which leaves potential for more modes of failure and there are many reports of cams breaking in falls. A concern for me to say the least.

I think they are a great design and have their place, but for the type of climbing and areas I climb at, are not the cam for me. I have never found a use for them here in California.

Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this product to a friend.
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   Jan 21, 2010 - 10:44pm
Cosimon · Climber · Boulder, CO
These are money in Indian Creek, or any deep splitter — great for anchors too, as it's more likely to fit whatever crack you're given.

Put them in some flaring granite mess and they seem more marginal than other cams to me.

That being said, I have yet to whip on one outside of the creek (where they hold pretty damn well)

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
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   Jan 21, 2010 - 02:00pm
Thrutchtastic · Climber · Sparks, NV
Yes, these guys are great for the bottomless splitters, but watch out--I've had these walk way into those same cracks (had to hook the trigger with the loops on a pair of nuts). Apart from covering a good deal of the sizes which surround them on my rack, Link Cams have two other fantastic traits:
--Funky, offset placements: If you've got a wavy or blocky crack that's leaving two lobes cammed way down and the other two barely scraping the sides, a Link Cam (of the right size, of course) can handle it.
--Narrow up front, opens up inside: Those cracks that will only admit a .3 through the front door, but nothing smaller than a .5 will work inside, are great Link Cam placements. I've come across a few pockets that have the same issue, and only one of these cams can give you a solid placement.

I love 'em for the two situations I've listed, but I still trust my Camalots more. (The thumb plunger isn't the most user-friendly, unlike my C4s.) Just like every other unique piece of pro, they have moments when they shine and moments when they'll scare the hell out of you.

They're very pretty, have a good weight, and look very cool--making them perfect for baffling non-climbers with the obvious skill necessary to use such a device. You and I know better, but your date will be way more impressed with a Link Cam than your grotty old stopper.

All-in-all, it's nice to have an extra piece that covers such a wide range. I usually save mine (I've used all four sizes, but only own the .5) until I really need it, which means it ends up on a lot of belay anchors. I could definitely do without it, but there are times that I slam that puppy in with such deft precision, with such a sense of the true nature of contemporary trad climbing as a meeting of human strength, skill, engineering, and ingenuity, that I can't help but run it out a little and pontificate on the matter, often to the chagrin of my belayer.

Happy climbing!

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Jan 21, 2010 - 01:59pm
Phil_B · Climber · Hercules, CA
I've had them since they first came out. I really love the wide range that they come in. Instead of smaller, I sometimes wish they came in larger sizes too.

Only downside I've ever had is last year at Tuolumne. I have the first gen Link Cams and as I was traversing, one of the cams caught its trigger wire on a knob and pulled it right off. Ruined my already tentative lead head for most of the day.

That said, Omega Pacific repaired it for free and it's working good as new.

Love 'em!

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Jan 21, 2010 - 01:23pm
the Fet · Climber · Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Pros:
Good for parallel cracks, fits a wider range than anything else.

Cons:
Not so good for flared placements. Heavy.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Jan 21, 2010 - 01:09pm
survival · Climber · A Token of My Extreme
I just got my first Robo-Bionicle-link cam for christmas!
I used it in Cochise Stronghold.
The downside: Yes, it's a bit heavy. Yes, it's too expensive.
But worst of all is being paranoid about putting my $100 toy in anything less than a perfect spot!! I actually took it out a couple times because I couldn't stand the thought of my pard not being able to get it out.
The upside: Versatile as heck! The range is amazing. It does work in an awful lot of places, and it's just too dang cool!

Here's a little link to a thread I did.
http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1044196&msg=1044836#msg1044836

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Jan 21, 2010 - 11:28pm
 
rgold · Climber · Poughkeepsie, NY
Link cams are specialty pieces---according to the manufacturer---and are fine for vertical cracks that do not have many internal features. Any placement that will not allow the piece to orient vertically in the direction of the load should be considered highly suspect; there is a chance the linkage will break. Many shallow placements have this feature and should be avoided. Flared placements, if they hold, can put considerably higher loads on the cam mechanisms and so are more questionable than equivalent placements with standard cams. Horizontal placements are out.

They have their uses, especially on the right type of rock, but shouldn't replace an appropriate selection of ordinary cams.
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Omega Pacific Link Cam
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